Lou Lim Ioc Park

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Area : Macau
Address: Estrada de Adolfo Loureiro no 10
Opening Hours: 06:00 -24:00
Tel: 2833 7676
Fee: Free
Transportation: Public Bus Information Station
Facilities: exhibition room, public toilet
Introduction:
The park, also known as “Lou Yun” (Lou’s Garden) and “Lou Kau Garden”, was named after the son of Lou Cheok Chi, a wealthy merchant of Macao in the 19th century. It is the only park in Macao Peninsula landscaped in the style of classical parks of Suzhou and Hangzhou of China, with prominent features like elegant pavilions, ponds, bridges, grottos, water cascades, curiously-shaped rockeries and winding corridors. The architectural elements of its Chon Chou Tong and park walls, styled after that of Southern Europe, blend in harmoniously with its classical layout. The park is indeed an embodiment of Chinese and Western influences, which also characterises the uniqueness of Macao’s culture. Back then, Lou Cheok Chi (also named Lou Va Sio) ordered the park to be built on a stretch of low-lying muddy land. The construction was followed by large-scale construction works ordered by his son Lou Lim Ioc at a later time that lasted until 1925. Chon Chou Tong used to be the place for reception of visitors. The park was divided up and sold after the death of Lou Lim Ioc. In 1973, the Macao government acquired one part of the park, restored it and turned it into a public park that is nowadays a popular leisure attraction for visitors and residents alike.

Next to the main entrance of the park stands the biggest River Red Gum Tree (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) in Macao. A moon-shaped archway can be seen facing the main entrance, and the ground under the archway is embellished with a stone mosaic of celestial cranes.

After walking past the grove and Pavilion of Verdure, a bas-relief replica of the illustration “Hou Yi in Pursuit of Elixir of Immortality” created by Li Zhaoquan, a sculptor from Guangzhou, comes into sight. A pair of couplets, inscribed on the left and right of the sculpture, describes the park scenery and wishes for success in the owner’s political career.

Facing an irregularly-shaped pond, Chon Chou Tong resembles a floating mansion amidst a scenic environment. Fish and tortoises swim in the pond, creating a lively ambience. There is a small stone statue of Kun Iam (Goddess of Mercy) next to the pond. Beyond Chon Chou Tong is a picturesque view of the winding bridge, towering rocks, serene bamboo groves, cascades and interlaced corridors that looks like a landscape painting. The scattered rocks in strange shapes across the park are comparable in size and scale to those in the The Lion Forest Park in Suzhou city. Nearby the Bridge of Nine Bends are a couple of rocks, intertwined footpaths, stone bridges and a slow-running brook to please the eyes of their spectators. The spacious lotus pond is a popular spot in Macao Peninsula which is always crowded in the summer when the lotus flowers are in full bloom. It has a nice view of the surrounding willow trees, whose curtains of drooping branches dance to the rhythms of a gentle breeze. The two Water Pine trees (Glyptostrobus pensilis) nearby the winding bridge are an endangered species of monotypic plant genus endemic to China. They are under first-class state protection due to their scarcity.

Rare plants can be found in the periphery of the Chinese-style Hundred Steps Promenade next to Pavilion of Plum Blossom. Nowadays, many senior residents like to get together at the Promenade to exercise and improve their fitness. It is also the venue for holding the annual orchid and bonsai exhibitions and is an ideal place for small exhibitions. After passing through the moon-shaped archway entrance, Pavilion of Verdure can be seen on the left side, surrounded by beautiful bonsais in an array of different shapes and styles.

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